Media Resources Photos

Drivers of connected buses receive an alert if they are on a potential collision course with another connected vehicle that is approaching the same intersection.

If the driver of a connected vehicle attempts to turn right in front of a moving streetcar, the driver receives an alert.

The THEA Connected Vehicle Pilot is working to improve safety for pedestrians in the midblock crosswalk outside the Hillsborough County Courthouse on Twiggs Street.

A streetcar motorman receives an alert that a connected vehicle is crossing the track ahead.

When the driver of a connected vehicle enters the downtown end of the Reversible Express Lanes in the wrong direction, the driver receives an alert.

Roadside infrastructure broadcasts vital safety information to connected vehicles as they approach downtown Tampa on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway.

Connected vehicles share vital safety information with each other via vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication.

Specially equipped vehicles communicate with a roadside unit (RSU) mounted on a pole on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes (REL) during the first public demonstration of the THEA Connected Vehicle Pilot on November 13, 2017. Nearly 50 RSUs are being installed along the REL and in downtown Tampa as part of the pilot.

Attendees of the first public demonstration of the THEA Connected Vehicle Pilot on November 13, 2017, saw a variety of safety alerts displayed in their vehicles’ rearview mirrors. This alert appears when the driver is at risk of a rear-end collision with another connected vehicle ahead.

Six vehicles equipped with connected vehicle technology carried more than 80 passengers in the first public demonstration of the THEA Connected Vehicle Pilot on November 13, 2017. Attendees experienced in-vehicle safety alerts along the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes, including wrong-way driving warnings and speed advisories.

Roadside units broadcast vital safety information to connected vehicles approaching the downtown end of the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes.

A dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) radio is installed in each participating driver’s trunk or rear storage compartment. This equipment communicates with other connected vehicles and roadside infrastructure.

Each participating vehicle is equipped with an onboard unit that communicates with other connected vehicles and roadside infrastructure.

One or more antennas are installed on the roof of each participating vehicle to enable vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication.

Participating drivers receive this alert when they are at risk of a rear-end collision with another connected vehicle in front of them.

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