Connected Vehicle Demonstration

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Driver participants in the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will have equipment installed in their cars, which will “talk” to other roadside units (RSUs) through vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication. The RSUs will send a message to the connected vehicle that is entering the Reversible Express Lanes in the wrong direction. It also warns other connected vehicles that a wrong-way driver is approaching.

Driver participants in the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will have equipment installed in their cars, which will “talk” to other roadside units (RSUs) through vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication. The RSUs will send a message to the vehicle and recommend a safe speed based on the length of the queue ahead.

The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot includes vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications applications, which will alert drivers of connected vehicles when another connected vehicle ahead brakes hard or when a forward collision with another connected vehicle is imminent.

Specially equipped vehicles communicate with a roadside unit (RSU) mounted on a pole on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes (REL) during the first public demonstration of the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot on November 13. Nearly 50 RSUs are being installed along the REL and in downtown Tampa as part of the pilot.

Attendees of the first public demonstration of the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot saw a variety of safety alerts displayed in their vehicles’ rearview mirrors. This alert appears when the driver is at risk of a rear-end collision with another connected vehicle ahead.

Six vehicles equipped with connected vehicle technology carried more than 80 passengers in the first public demonstration of the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot on November 13. Attendees experienced in-vehicle safety alerts along the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes, including wrong-way driving warnings and speed advisories.

Roadside units (RSU) installed along the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes (REL) will determine if the driver of a connected vehicle is approaching the downtown end at an unsafe speed. The RSUs will send a message to the vehicle and recommend a safe speed based on the length of the queue ahead. RSUs also will be installed at select downtown intersections to alert connected vehicle drivers, buses, and streetcars to the presence of pedestrians at crosswalks.

The short-range radio unit will be installed in the driver’s trunk or rear storage compartment. It is about the size of a paperback book. This equipment communicates with other connected vehicles and devices.

Driver participants in the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will have equipment installed in their cars, which will include a short-range radio unit; one or more antennas; and a new rearview mirror. The equipment will “talk” to other equipped cars to help prevent crashes. When in the downtown deployment area, cars will also communicate with traffic signals, crosswalks and more to enhance safety and keep traffic moving.

Our technicians will install up to three small antennas on driver participant’s roof. This equipment sends and receives data. The number of antennas and where they are mounted will depend on the make and model of the driver’s vehicle.

Drivers of connected vehicles will receive an alert that means they are at risk of a rear-end collision with a vehicle in front of them. This alert only will be received from other connected vehicles.

Drivers of connected vehicles will receive an alert when in the downtown Tampa deployment area to help avoid crashes. This alert means another connected vehicle is braking hard in traffic ahead of the driver. Drivers will only receive this warning from another connected vehicle.

Drivers of connected vehicles on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes will receive an alert when traffic is backed up ahead. This warns the driver to slow down to a recommended speed as the vehicle approaches the end of a queue.

Drivers of connected vehicles on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes will receive an alert when traffic is backed up ahead. The driver also will receive an alert when the vehicle is approaching a curve at an unsafe speed.

Drivers of connected vehicles on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes will receive an alert when they are driving in a reduced speed zone.

Some lanes at the end of the downtown Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes are closed to all traffic at certain times of the day. Drivers of connected vehicles will receive this alert when they enter a zone that’s off limits.

Participating drivers will receive a Wrong Way alert when they continue in the wrong direction on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes. The application also broadcasts a warning to other equipped vehicles on the reversible lanes that a wrong-way driver is approaching.

Drivers of connected vehicles in downtown Tampa will receive a Do Not Enter alert if they try to enter the downtown end of the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes (REL) when it is closed.


Drivers of connected vehicles on the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes will receive warnings when cars on the road ahead have suddenly slowed down or come to a stop.

Participating drivers will receive alerts if they are approaching the downtown end of the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway’s Reversible Express Lanes at an unsafe speed.

Connected vehicle technology will be installed at the midblock crosswalk on East Twiggs Street at the Hillsborough County Courthouse to improve pedestrian safety. When sensors detect a pedestrian, roadside equipment will broadcast that information to connected vehicles in the vicinity, and their drivers will receive an alert.

As pedestrians cross East Twiggs Street using the midblock crosswalk at the Hillsborough County Courthouse, approaching drivers whose cars are equipped with connected vehicle technology will receive an alert that a pedestrian is in their path.

Downtown traffic congestion can cause buses to fall behind schedule. Now buses on certain routes will be able to make up for lost time by requesting priority at certain traffic signals.

Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) buses on certain downtown routes will communicate with traffic signals to request priority and stay on schedule

The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will equip TECO Line streetcars with devices that enable them to detect other connected vehicles. Streetcar operators will receive a warning when a connected vehicle is about to cross the track in front of the streetcar, reducing the risk of a collision.

Traffic congestion sometimes prevents Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) buses from reachingtheir stops on time. The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will enable traffic signals to prioritize bus movements when necessary to keep buses on schedule.

The downtown terminus of the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway Reversible Express Lanes (REL) is a potential entry point for wrong-way drivers. The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will detect and warn wrong-way drivers before they get on the expressway. Other drivers on the REL will also receive a warning if a wrong-way driver is approaching.

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