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Stay Informed Media Resources

A Reporter’s Guide

MEDIA RELEASES

Document Name
Format
Date Posted

DOCUMENTS / PRESENTATIONS

Document Name
Format
Date Posted

VIDEO CLIPS

CV Graphic Animated
Animated Intersection Loop – 15 seconds (MP4) The connected vehicle program will develop and deploy systems that enable cars, trucks, buses, bicyclists, pedestrians and traffic control systems to communicate with each other. The shared information helps improve the safety and efficiency of traffic while reducing the environmental impact.
CV Graphic Animated
THEA V2I / Connected Vehicles B-Roll – 5 seconds (MP4) See what connected vehicles would look like on THEA roads: the same cars, the same roads, but with new technology enabling vehicles and the roadway infrastructure to talk to each other.
USDOT Connected Vehicles the Future of Transportation Overview Video
USDOT Connected Vehicles the Future of Transportation Overview Video – 7:22 (WMV) Take a look at the future of transportation. This animation from the Federal Highway Administration shows how new technology, some of which will soon be deployed in downtown Tampa, will help improve transportation nationwide.
Connected Vehicle Technology
Get to Know Joe Waggoner – USDOT CV Pilot Program (YouTube) | Download (MP4) Joe Waggoner discusses the Tampa Hillsborough Expressway Authority partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation for the CV Pilot Program.
Connected Vehicle Technology
Get to Know Joe Waggoner – Connected Vehicle Technology (YouTube) Future is now! Listen to Joe discuss connected vehicle technology and autonomous vehicle technology.

 

PHOTOS

On January 19-20, 2016, Federal Highway Administration officials visited several of the sites where THEA plans to deploy connected vehicle technology.

THEA Executive Director Joe Waggoner describes progress on the connected vehicle pilot program at the 2015 Florida Automated Vehicles Summit in Jacksonville, Florida.

On September 14, 2015, Florida Senator Bill Nelson and U.S. Transportation Undersecretary Peter Rogoff joined Tampa Bay area transportation leaders to announce THEA’s connected vehicle pilot program.

tampacvpilot-pedestrian-safety-east-twiggs-street

The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will install sensors and wireless communication devices at several downtown crosswalks to improve pedestrian safety and mobility.

tampacvpilot-teco-line-streetcar-system

The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will equip TECO Line streetcars with devices that enable them to detect connected vehicles and pedestrians. Streetcar operators will receive a warning when a car or pedestrian is about to cross the track ahead, reducing the risk of a collision.

tampacvpilot-curve-queues

Traffic tie-ups at the downtown terminus of the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway Reversible Express Lanes (REL) increase the risk of rear-end crashes. Drivers on the REL who participate in the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will receive a warning when motorists on the road ahead have suddenly slowed down or come to a stop.

tampacvpilot-lee-roy-selmon-expressway-reversible-express-lanes

Traffic tie-ups at intersection of East Twiggs Street, Meridian Avenue and the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway Reversible Express Lanes (REL) increase the risk of rear-end crashes. Drivers on the REL who participate in the Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will receive a warning when they are approaching the intersection at an unsafe speed.

tampacvpilot-pedestrian-safety-east-twiggs-street-2

Sensors and wireless communication devices will improve pedestrian safety at the midblock crosswalk on Twiggs Street at the Hillsborough County Courthouse.

tampacvpilot-wrong-way-drivers-lee-roy-selmon-expressway-2

The downtown terminus of the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway Reversible Express Lanes (REL) is a potential entry point for wrong-way drivers. The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will detect and warn wrong-way drivers before they get on the expressway. Other drivers on the REL will also receive a warning if a wrong-way driver is approaching.

tampacvpilot-hart-buses

Traffic congestion sometimes prevents Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) buses from reachingtheir stops on time. The Tampa Connected Vehicle Pilot will enable traffic signals to prioritize bus movements when necessary to keep buses on schedule.

INFOGRAPHICS

Eco-Traffic Signal Priority enables buses to communicate with traffic lights to improve the efficiency of transit, helping reduce emissions.

Connected Vehicle Pedestrian Crossing alerts the bus driver of a pedestrian in its path, improving safety.

Curve Speed Warning lets drivers know they are going too fast for an approaching curve, or if traffic is backed up around the curve, reducing the number of collisions.

Emergency Electric Brake Warning enables one vehicle to alert others (and the infrastructure) that the driver has braked suddenly, reducing the number of collisions.

Forward Collision Warning alerts the driver that there is a stopped or slow-moving vehicle ahead, reducing the number of collisions.

Intersection Movement Assistance alerts the driver that it is not safe to enter an intersection, reducing the number of collisions.

Pedestrian In Signalized Crosswalk uses mobile app technology to detect pedestrians in crosswalks, then alert drivers about the pedestrian, reducing the number of collisions.

Vehicle Turning Right In Front of Bus (or Trolley) enables vehicles to communicate their location, speed and direction to nearby transit vehicles to help avoid collisions.

RENDERINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS

Connected vehicle drivers can receive in-car alerts when it’s not safe to enter an intersection because another vehicle is running a red light or making a sudden turn.

A connected vehicle can alert its driver when there is a sudden-braking or slow-moving vehicle ahead, and there is a risk of a collision.

Vehicles, pedestrians and roadside equipment can share information as often as 10 times per second, transmitting and receiving messages about vehicle behavior and roadway conditions.

Real-time traffic data provided by connected vehicles can help make transit more reliable by enabling traffic signals to give priority to buses.

Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication involves personal, commercial, transit and emergency vehicles, even trains and pedestrians, communicating their location and status with roadside equipment mounted on street lights or traffic signals.

Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) communication enables personal, commercial, transit and emergency vehicles to share vital information with each other, including speed, emergency braking, intersection movement and crash status.

Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication involves personal, commercial, transit and emergency vehicles, even pedestrians, communicating their location and status with roadside equipment mounted on street lights or traffic signals.

Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) communication enables personal, commercial, transit and emergency vehicles to share vital information with each other, including speed, emergency braking, intersection movement and crash status.

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